FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

What are you most curious about?

01

What does Lumhaa mean and how do you pronounce it?

Lumhaa means moment in Hindi and is pronounced lʌm-hɑ

02

How did Lumhaa start?

A few years ago, our founder Shriya Sekhsaria was writing a book about terminally ill children in India. To make the book as authentic as possible, she spent some time living with the children. Unfortunately, several of them passed away before the book was published. In an effort to alleviate some of the families' grief and “immortalize” the children, she created little jars and filled them with the children's memories in the form of short stories, moments, and quotes on Post-It notes.

Since then, she has worked with more people ranging from soldiers in the army to senior citizens (some on the onset of Alzheimer's) to make memory jars for them and their families. Shriya soon expanded the concept of these memory jars to include other people ranging from Princeton University students for whom she made memory jars as birthday gifts and as a way to help people capture special moments in their everyday lives.

03

How is Lumhaa different from what is already out there?

Social media has been shown to cause depression and increase loneliness. Research shows that Lumhaa increases happiness and decreases loneliness, amongst other psychological benefits. This is partially achieved by rejecting the notion of using posts to build an online reputation -- we’ve done away with profiles and are putting memories at the center instead.

We use the latest technology such as blockchain to ensure your private data remains private -- even Lumhaa cannot access your private memories, let alone a third party. Lumhaa also harnesses the power of extended reality -- both augmented and virtual -- to bring you unique immersive experiences with your own and others’ memories.

You can work with your friends, family, or coworkers to collaboratively create your personal, family, and organizational stories in a safe place, but your interaction is not limited to your friends or friends of friends, the way most social media sites are -- you can read memories from time periods and worlds you may not have otherwise come across.

Read more about us, our story, and our founder’s inspiration.

01

What are memory jars?

Memory jars are collections of notes, recordings, photographs, and other mementos designed for recording life’s special moments, memories and milestones. Lumhaa helps you create your jars in a digital space, providing a platform in which an individual or group can build their story. Just like a physical memory jar, you can fill your Lumhaa memory jar with text notes, videos, images, or audio from significant moments in your life —the jar encapsulates what you believe is your own or your group’s story.

02

What should I put in my memory jar?

You could put any text, photo, video, or voice note you want to! People make memory jars for all sorts of things, ranging from their favorite memories to memories with their children to memories they would rather never think about again. If you’re confused about what to begin your memory jar with, start by responding to our question for the day.

03

What types of memory jars can I make?

  • Personal diary for memories that document your life.

  • Family Trees to share memories and record family history.

  • Friend circles to share moments between friends.

  • Organizational jars for specific clubs, volunteer groups, etc.

  • Special event jars to catalog birthdays, anniversaries, weddings, graduations, vacations.

04

What is Lumhaa World? How is it different from Lumhaa?

Lumhaa World is crafted for large groups and organizations. A Lumhaa World is a digital space exclusively for your organization to create memory jars and connect through shared experiences. The primary features offered to Lumhaa World members include hiring interviewers to collect memories for your organization and sharing of organization-wide memories to other sites such as your company’s website. For more details, visit the Lumhaa World page.

01

Are my memories private?

Memory jars are collections of notes, recordings, photographs, and other mementos designed for recording life’s special moments, memories and milestones. Lumhaa helps you create your jars in a digital space, providing a platform in which an individual or group can build their story. Just like a physical memory jar, you can fill your Lumhaa memory jar with text notes, videos, images, or audio from significant moments in your life —the jar encapsulates what you believe is your own or your group’s story.

  • Private to you

    • Memories that are private to you cannot be accessed by anyone but you. Our Blockchain technology ensures that even we, Lumhaa, cannot see them.

  • Private to the jars

    • The memories that are private to the jars are shareable with people given access to the jars or family trees.

  • Public

    • Public posts can be seen by anyone who logs onto the Lumhaa. Because you do not need a login to access the Engage page of the Lumhaa website or app, anyone can see your public posts. Memories will be logged anonymously, which means your name will not be published with the post.

  • Lumhaa World works essentially in the same way, but public posts created within the World can be obtained by the organizations and shared on their sites or social media.

01

What is the research behind Lumhaa?

The research behind Lumhaa shows that writing down and reading memories decreases loneliness and increases happiness; interestingly, the same effect occurs for not only personal memories, but also those of others, regardless of whether or not the stories are happy. Participants ranging from Princeton seniors to seniors citizens with Alzheimer's created memory jars. They were then asked to return ranging from a week to a year after, and were given memories to read, either their own or those of others. It was found that the acts of writing down and reading memories led to increased sense of control in life and a greater sense of purpose. The research has won several awards, including the Edward E. Jones Memorial Prize, Howard Crosby Prize, and has also been awarded on Princeton Research Day.